Need for an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery

  1. In a nutshell — An association dedicated to practical quantum computing
  2. Details are beyond the scope of this overview paper
  3. Need for an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery to promote quantum computing as a profession while advancing its science, technology, and applications
  4. The single most powerful focus of an association dedicated to quantum computing is the leap (or slog) to practical quantum computing
  5. The exact name of the association is not a critical part of this proposal
  6. A nonprofit organization focused on serving its members
  7. Focused exclusively on the needs of members
  8. Local, regional, national, international, and both offline and online in scope
  9. The essential activities and areas of interest of an association for quantum computing machinery
  10. The essential technical areas of interest of an association for quantum computing machinery
  11. The essential activities of an association for quantum computing machinery
  12. Committees and working groups
  13. Personas, use cases, and access patterns of an association for quantum computing machinery
  14. Personas for an association dedicated to quantum computing
  15. Adjunct affiliation
  16. Other personas
  17. Use cases for an association dedicated to quantum computing
  18. Access patterns for an association dedicated to quantum computing
  19. QSTEM — expanding STEM to emphasize quantum effects
  20. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) as the inspiration for an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery (AQCM)
  21. What does the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) do?
  22. Origin of ACM
  23. ACM awards
  24. Why a separate association, for now
  25. Quantum computing needs a dedicated association, undistracted by all of the baggage and competing interests of classical computing
  26. Quantum computing needs a keen focus on hardware as well
  27. Criteria for merger with ACM proper
  28. Relation to IEEE and the IEEE Computer Society
  29. Summary of the IEEE Computer Society
  30. Relation to the American Physical Society (APS)
  31. Relation to Nature magazine
  32. arXiv as the premiere repository for published papers on quantum computing
  33. phys.org for news on the latest papers posted on arXiv.org
  34. A simplified and streamlined association
  35. Cooperation with ACM
  36. ACM Transactions on Quantum Computing (TQC) journal
  37. Quantum computing is only a small “corner” of ACM, a diluted focus, not a dedicated and exclusive focus
  38. ACM as a scientific and educational organization
  39. Association for Quantum Computing Machinery as a QSTEM research, practice, and educational organization
  40. When should such an association be brought into existence?
  41. The association will happen when a motivated team of founding fathers make it happen
  42. Timing for creation of an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery
  43. But the sooner this effort gets started, the better
  44. Why it may be too soon to get this organized
  45. Need for a core team of elite founding fathers
  46. Need for an advisory board to drive organization of the association
  47. My only role is at this idea stage
  48. Details of founding, organization, and operation of the association are beyond the scope of this proposal
  49. Should founding of the association be synchronized with The ENIAC Moment for quantum computing?
  50. ACM was founded very shortly after ENIAC went operational
  51. The ENIAC Moment for quantum computing should be in sight
  52. 28 if not 32-qubit algorithms should be common
  53. Origin relative to a Quantum Winter
  54. Need for sponsors
  55. Reverse sponsorships
  56. Are the quantum old guard over the hill or too busy to focus on founding an association?
  57. But the quantum old guard would be ideal for an emeritus advisory board
  58. Should academia or industry lead the push for an association?
  59. Role of government is vitally significant — not just academia and industry
  60. One association vs. let 1,000 associations bloom
  61. Wildcard: an association led by students or smaller entrepreneurs and startups with an interest in growing the talent pool
  62. Research, product, and practice
  63. Commercial competition
  64. Drop “Machinery” to make it the Association for Quantum Computing?
  65. Quantum information science
  66. Quantum effects
  67. Quantum information
  68. Need for new fields
  69. Need for the new field of quantum information theory
  70. Quantum information science vs. quantum information theory
  71. Quantum information science and technology (QIST)
  72. Quantum science
  73. Need for the new field of quantum computer engineering
  74. Need for the new field of quantum computer science
  75. Need for the new field of quantum software engineering
  76. Local chapters
  77. Student chapters
  78. ACM Special Interest Groups
  79. Special Interest Groups for quantum computing
  80. Publications for quantum computing
  81. Conferences, symposia, and trade shows for quantum computing
  82. An association dedicated to quantum computing wouldn’t replace all other venues for publishing papers and holding conferences
  83. Symposia for quantum computing
  84. Quantum computing community
  85. Quantum computing ecosystem
  86. Distinction between the quantum computing community and the quantum computing ecosystem
  87. Investors and venture capital for quantum computing
  88. A rough 50/50 split between theory and practice
  89. Need for curriculum and syllabus for quantum computing education
  90. Certification for quantum computing skills
  91. Recognition and awards for quantum computing
  92. Students — the future of quantum computing
  93. Post-ACM focus and organization
  94. How can someone get involved? Just do it! Do your own thing! Do something, anything, and see what develops!
  95. For now, quantum computing remains a mere laboratory curiosity
  96. For now, quantum computing is still more appropriate for the lunatic fringe rather than mainstream application developers
  97. For now, quantum computing remains in the pre-commercialization stage, not ready for commercialization yet and at risk of premature commercialization
  98. My original proposal for this topic
  99. Summary and conclusions

In a nutshell — An association dedicated to practical quantum computing

  1. To advance the science, technology, and applications of quantum computing. Including research and the development and deployment of quantum applications.
  2. To advance quantum computing as a profession. Including education and training, professional development, and networking of professionals and students.
  • Practical quantum computers capable of addressing production-scale practical real-world problems and professionals capable of exploiting them.
  • An association dedicated to producing practical quantum computers capable of addressing production-scale practical real-world problems and professionals capable of exploiting them.
  • An association dedicated to practical quantum computing.
  1. Quantum information theory. Information at the quantum level. From basic concepts to advanced theory.
  2. Quantum computer engineering. The hardware, particularly the programming model, architecture, and qubit technology and qubit control. Including fault-tolerant quantum computing — full, automatic, and transparent error detection and correction.
  3. Quantum computer science. Quantum algorithms operating on quantum information.
  4. Quantum software engineering. Design, development, deployment, and operation of quantum applications which utilize quantum algorithms.
  5. Quantum algorithms and applications. Application domain-specific quantum algorithms and software.
  6. Quantum infrastructure and support software. Including software tools.
  1. Support for research. Administrative and institutional support for research. Separate from the specific technical content and funding of the research.
  2. Quantum computing education and training. Both academic and commercial. Seminars, workshops, and conferences as well. Professional growth. Life-long learning. Career development.
  3. Quantum certification. Play a role in the development and promotion of certification programs for all aspects of quantum computing skills. Credentials which bear witness to the skills of a professional.
  4. Quantum computing standards. To produce and promote the use of formal (or even informal) standards in the quantum computing community and ecosystem. Most importantly, to take an active role in keeping attention focused on standards.
  5. Quantum publications. Books and journals. Print, electronic, and online. Email newsletters. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  6. Quantum computing community. Conferences. In-person and online networking and support forums. Hackathons. Local and student chapters. Employment and academic opportunities. Funding opportunities — academic and commercial, private sector, and government. Emphasis on research, products, and practice. Part of the larger quantum computing ecosystem, which includes vendors, customers, users, and investors and venture capital.
  7. Quantum computing ecosystem. The quantum computing community plus vendors, customers, users, and investors and venture capital.
  8. Students. Outreach. Community. Education. Internship opportunities. Mentoring. Research opportunities. Recognition and awards. Job placement in industry, government, and academia.
  9. Recognition and awards. Acknowledge and reward notable technical and professional contributions to the field.
  10. Code of ethics and professional conduct.
  1. Association for Computing Machinery. Primarily focused on software.
  2. IEEE. Primarily focused on hardware.
  3. IEEE Computer Society. Mix of hardware and software.

Details are beyond the scope of this overview paper

Need for an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery to promote quantum computing as a profession while advancing its science, technology, and applications

  1. To advance the science, technology, and applications of quantum computing. Including theory, research, prototyping, experimentation, and the development and deployment of quantum applications.
  2. To advance quantum computing as a profession. Including education, training, professional development, career development, and networking of professionals and students. Including outreach and attracting and educating young people and seasoned professionals alike of classical computing and other professions to pursue a career in quantum computing.

The single most powerful focus of an association dedicated to quantum computing is the leap (or slog) to practical quantum computing

The exact name of the association is not a critical part of this proposal

A nonprofit organization focused on serving its members

Focused exclusively on the needs of members

Local, regional, national, international, and both offline and online in scope

The essential activities and areas of interest of an association for quantum computing machinery

  1. Technical areas of interest. The science and technology itself. The STEM content.
  2. Activities. Professional activities in pursuit of advancing the science and technology. The process of producing the STEM content.

The essential technical areas of interest of an association for quantum computing machinery

  1. Quantum information science. The umbrella concept covering everything related to quantum information: quantum computing, quantum communication, quantum networking, quantum metrology, and quantum sensing.
  2. Quantum effects. The essential concepts from quantum mechanics and quantum physics which underpin quantum information science.
  3. Quantum information theory. Information at the quantum level. From basic concepts to advanced theory. Applies across all of the areas of quantum information science. Binary basis states (or even higher order than strictly binary), continuous values of phase and probability amplitudes and probabilities, and strings of binary basis states for product states of entangled qubits. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  4. Quantum computer engineering. The hardware, particularly the programming model, architecture, and qubit technology and qubit control. Including fault-tolerant quantum computing — full, automatic, and transparent error detection and correction. Representing quantum information in its most basic and primitive form and operations on that information in their most basic and primitive form. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  5. Quantum computer science. Quantum algorithms operating on quantum information. Focusing on generic algorithms and algorithmic building blocks and software that is generic and not specific to particular application domains. Translation between classical and quantum information. Hybrid quantum/classical and quantum-inspired algorithms as well. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  6. Quantum software engineering. Design, development, deployment, and operation of quantum applications, which utilize quantum algorithms in conjunction with classical code. Modular design, modules, modular structure, interfaces, APIs, systems, system architectures, and networked services as well. User experience (UX) design. The craft of software development including specifications, coding style, naming conventions, commenting conventions, and documentation. Staged development, prototyping, scalability. Source, version, and release control. Quality assurance and testing in general. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  7. Quantum algorithms and applications. Application domain-specific quantum algorithms and software. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  8. Quantum infrastructure and support software. Includes software tools, compilers, libraries, frameworks, utilities, support software, testing and quality assurance, performance and capacity characterization and testing, benchmarking and resource estimation, and system and network infrastructure. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  9. Quantum cybersecurity and cyberwarfare. Generally surrounding cryptography and post-quantum cryptography. Nominally part of infrastructure, but with dramatic ramifications beyond simple computations.

The essential activities of an association for quantum computing machinery

  1. Support for research. Administrative and institutional support for research. Separate from the specific technical content and funding of the research.
  2. Quantum computing education and training. Both academic and commercial. Seminars, workshops, and conferences as well. Professional growth. Life-long learning. Career development.
  3. Quantum certification. Play a role in the development and promotion of certification programs for all aspects of quantum computing skills. Credentials which bear witness to the skills of a professional.
  4. Quantum computing standards. To produce and promote the use of formal (or even informal) standards in the quantum computing community and ecosystem. Most importantly, to take an active role in keeping attention focused on standards.
  5. Quantum publications. Books and journals. Print, electronic, and online. Email newsletters. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  6. Quantum computing community. Conferences. In-person and online networking and support forums. Hackathons. Local and student chapters. Employment and academic opportunities. Funding opportunities — academic and commercial, private sector, and government. Emphasis on research, products, and practice. Part of the larger quantum computing ecosystem, which includes vendors, customers, users, and investors and venture capital.
  7. Quantum computing ecosystem. The quantum computing community plus vendors, customers, users, and investors and venture capital.
  8. Students. Outreach. Community. Education. Internship opportunities. Mentoring. Research opportunities. Recognition and awards. Job placement in industry, government, and academia.
  9. Recognition and awards. Acknowledge and reward notable technical and professional contributions to the field.
  10. Public policy. Advocacy and initiatives in all areas of public policy to influence policymakers.
  11. Code of ethics and professional conduct.
  12. Committees and working groups. Formal or ad hoc groups intended to focus on specific or general technical, non-technical, or professional matters.

Committees and working groups

  1. Standards for newer technologies.
  2. Education and curricula issues. Including proposals for education and training for new technologies. Or new approaches to existing technologies. Or new pedagogical approaches.
  3. Students. Addressing issues relating to student participation in the association, including student participation in committees and working groups.
  4. Public policy. Continual review and revision for advocacy and initiatives in all areas of public policy to influence policymakers.
  5. Ethical matters. Addressing scandals or unresolved conflicts. Continual review and revision of ethics rules and code of conduct.
  6. Emergent technological, social, political, or economic issues worthy of some response. Review, respond, and possibly address.
  7. Outreach. Considering new possibilities and reviewing existing approaches.
  8. Vision, mission, and strategic objectives. Continual and occasional review and revision of the overall vision, mission, and strategic objectives of the association. Sometimes expanding and extending, sometimes contracting.
  9. Programs and initiatives. Reviewing and revising the various programs and initiatives of the association.

Personas, use cases, and access patterns of an association for quantum computing machinery

  1. Personas. Or roles. Who is interested or involved.
  2. Use cases. What they are trying to achieve. Areas of interest and study.
  3. Access patterns. Specific tasks they are attempting to perform. Or goals they are trying to achieve.

Personas for an association dedicated to quantum computing

  1. Scientists.
  2. Computer scientists,
  3. Mathematicians.
  4. Engineers.
  5. Software engineers.
  6. Software developers.
  7. Application developers.
  8. Quality assurance engineers.
  9. Students.
  10. Professors and other educators.

Adjunct affiliation

  1. IT staff in general.
  2. Network engineers.
  3. System administration.
  4. Network administration.
  5. Installation technicians.
  6. Maintenance technicians.
  7. Repair technicians.
  8. Software installation.
  9. Network security.
  10. End users.
  11. Quality assurance technicians.
  12. Solution engineers.
  13. Sales engineers.
  14. Solution specialists.
  15. Supervisors and managers of any of the above.

Other personas

  1. Chip design and fabrication, testing, and production.
  2. AI. Such as machine learning. But not focused on quantum.
  3. Data science. But not focused on quantum.
  4. Mathematics. Linear algebra. Statistics. But not focused on quantum.
  5. Technical planning. But not focused on quantum.
  6. Product planning.
  7. Technical management.
  8. General management. Such as CTO, CIO, or even COO and CEO. But without any focus on quantum.

Use cases for an association dedicated to quantum computing

  1. Theory.
  2. Research.
  3. Publication.
  4. Education.
  5. Outreach.
  6. Application areas.
  1. Physics.
  2. Chemistry.
  3. Drug design and discovery.
  4. Material design.
  5. Optimization.
  6. Machine learning.
  7. Finance.
  8. Cybersecurity.

Access patterns for an association dedicated to quantum computing

  1. Perform research.
  2. Publish research.
  3. Utilize published research.
  4. Educate.
  5. Train.
  6. Study.
  7. Learn.
  8. Certification.
  9. Design. Algorithms and applications.
  10. Develop. Applications.
  11. Debug. Algorithms and applications.
  12. Test. Algorithms and applications.
  13. Test, evaluate, and characterize performance. Algorithms and applications.
  14. Distribute applications.
  15. Install applications.
  16. Test installed applications.
  17. Deploy applications.
  18. Use deployed applications.
  19. Monitor deployed applications.
  20. Debug and troubleshoot deployed applications.
  21. Upgrade deployed applications.
  22. Characterize performance and capacity of applications.
  23. Benchmarking.
  24. Resource estimation. What quantum resources does this algorithm require — qubit count, circuit depth, qubit fidelity, granularity of phase and probability amplitude, qubit connectivity.

QSTEM — expanding STEM to emphasize quantum effects

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) as the inspiration for an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery (AQCM)

What does the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) do?

  1. Publications.
  2. Conferences.
  3. Networking. Interaction with other computing professionals.
  4. Promoting computing among students. Students are the primary pool for future computing professionals. Encouraging and supporting their interest in computing is an essential activity of ACM.
  5. Professional and career development. Education, training, and access to opportunities.
  6. Advancing computing technology. Primarily focused on software. IEEE focuses more on hardware.
  7. Advancing the profession. Including advocating for ethics.
  8. Advocacy for public policy.
  1. Educational and scientific computing society.
  2. Advancing computing as a science & profession.
  3. We see a world where computing helps solve tomorrow’s problems — where we use our knowledge and skills to advance the profession and make a positive impact.
  4. ACM, the world’s largest educational and scientific computing society, delivers resources that advance computing as a science and a profession. ACM provides the computing field’s premier Digital Library and serves its members and the computing profession with leading-edge publications, conferences, and career resources.
  5. ACM brings together computing educators, researchers, and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources, and address the field’s challenges. As the world’s largest computing society, ACM strengthens the profession’s collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for life‐long learning, career development, and professional networking.
  6. Founded at the dawn of the computer age, ACM’s reach extends to every part of the globe, with more than half of its nearly 100,000 members residing outside the U.S. Its growing membership has led to Councils in Europe, India, and China, fostering networking opportunities that strengthen ties within and across countries and technical communities. Their actions enhance ACM’s ability to raise awareness of computing’s important technical, educational, and social issues around the world.
  7. ACM was established in 1947 soon after the creation of ENIAC, the first stored-program digital computer, to “advance the science, development, construction, and application of the new machinery for computing, reasoning, and other handling of information.”
  8. Mission. ACM is a global scientific and educational organization dedicated to advancing the art, science, engineering, and application of computing, serving both professional and public interests by fostering the open exchange of information and by promoting the highest professional and ethical standards.
  9. Vision. ACM will continue to be the premiere global computing society.
  10. Core values. Technical excellence, Education and technical advancement, Ethical computing and technology for positive impact, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.
  11. Special Interest Groups Form around ACM’s Powerful, Vibrant Communities. Networking opportunities in ACM’s 38 Special Interest Groups (SIGs) are always expanding, reflecting the growth of computing’s discrete disciplines and technical communities. The leading representatives of their fields, ACM SIGs sponsor annual conferences, workshops, and symposia serving practitioner‐ and research‐based constituencies. Because they provide objective arenas for novel, often competing ideas, many of these meetings have become premier global events.
  12. Chapters: ACM’s “Local Neighborhoods”. ACM’s broad‐based infrastructure supports more than 860 professional and student chapters worldwide. These “local neighborhoods” offer opportunities for members to gain access to critical research and establish personal networking systems.
  13. ACM, Member-driven, Volunteer-led. ACM offers volunteer opportunities for members and non‐members that create networking possibilities and enhance career development. At the grassroots level, ACM volunteers serve a growing international community of researchers, practitioners and students by lending valuable assistance at conferences, publications, webinars, and other events. Volunteers have a direct and critical impact on ACM’s governance through the ACM Council, the highest governing authority. Volunteers also serve on the ACM Executive Committee and numerous other boards and task forces. Volunteers — members and non-members alike — hold leadership roles in ACM journal publications as Editors‐in‐Chief, Associate Editors, and reviewers. They also comprise the ACM Education Board, which provides curriculum recommendations for four‐year universities as well as community colleges. The Board’s 2013 recommendations in computer science have even been translated into Chinese.
  14. ACM’s “Big Tent” Philosophy Embraces Diversity. The ACM community is as diverse as the subfields that comprise computer science, from educators and researchers in academia to practitioners in project management, industrial research, and software development, engineering, and application design. This diversity extends to their gender and ethnicities. The ACM Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council coordinates and promotes diversity, equity and inclusion efforts throughout the organization. The ACM Women’s Committee (ACM‐W) advocates internationally for full engagement of women in all aspects of computing. The ACM‐sponsored Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing brings together students, faculty, researchers, and professionals from all backgrounds. It provides a supportive networking environment for under‐represented groups across a range of computing and information technology fields.
  15. Students — Supporting Tomorrow’s Problem Solvers Today. ACM Student Chapters enable students to fully engage in its professional activities. Participants from more than 500 colleges and universities worldwide enhance their learning through the exchange of ideas with other students and established professionals. ACM offers $1.5 million in scholarships and an affordable Student Membership. Both undergraduate and graduate student members can compete in ACM Student Research Competitions, an internationally recognized venue hosted at ACM conferences and sponsored by Microsoft. They benefit by sharing their research with peers and academic and industry luminaries, gaining recognition and experience, and earning rewards.
  16. Giving Credit where Credit Is Due. ACM recognizes excellence through its eminent awards for technical and professional achievements and contributions in computer science and information technology. It also names as Fellows and Distinguished Members those members who, in addition to professional accomplishments, have made significant contributions to ACM’s mission. ACM’s prestigious A.M. Turing Award is accompanied by a $1 million prize provided by Google for contributions of lasting and major technical importance to the computing field. Other prominent ACM awards recognize achievements by young computing professionals, educators, theoretical computer scientists, software systems innovators, and pioneers who have made humanitarian and cross-discipline contributions.
  17. Providing Tireless Advocacy of Critical Public Policy Issues. ACM leverages its international respect and leadership to shape public policy worldwide. Through its geographically distributed policy entities in Europe and North America, ACM helps develop policy statements, issue briefs, white papers, and reports to provide policymakers with knowledge‐based analysis that accelerates computing innovations which benefit society. It also delivers expertise on education policy, women in computing, and diversification of computing.
  18. ACM Publications — Advancing Research, Technology, and Innovation. As a leading global source for scientific information, ACM promotes computer research and innovation through its journals, magazines, and the proceedings of more than 170 annual conferences and symposia. ACM authors are among the world’s leading thinkers in computing and information technologies, providing original research and firsthand perspectives. ACM also provides access to the ACM Digital Library (DL), a comprehensive and expanding database of literature and detailed bibliographic resources for computing professionals from a wide range of publishers. The DL currently includes more than 600,000 full-text articles authored by leading researchers in computing. The flagship magazine Communications of the ACM provides industry news, commentary, observations, and practical research.
  19. Guiding Members with a Framework of Ethical Conduct. The ACM Code of Ethics identifies the elements of every member’s commitment to ethical professional conduct. It outlines fundamental considerations that contribute to society and human well-being and those that specifically relate to professional responsibilities, organizational imperatives, and compliance with the code.
  20. Lifelong Learning. ACM offers lifelong learning resources including online books from O’Reilly, online courses from Skillsoft, TechTalks on the hottest topics in computing and IT, and more.
  1. https://www.acm.org/
  2. https://www.acm.org/about-acm
  3. https://www.acm.org/about-acm/about-the-acm-organization
  4. https://www.acm.org/about-acm/mission-vision-values-goals
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_for_Computing_Machinery

Origin of ACM

  1. The Association for Computing Machinery was founded as the Eastern Association for Computing Machinery at a meeting at Columbia University in New York on September 15, 1947.
  2. ACM was established in 1947 soon after the creation of ENIAC, the first stored-program digital computer.
  3. Its creation was the logical outgrowth of increasing interest in computers as evidenced by several events, including a January 1947 symposium at Harvard University on large-scale digital calculating machinery; the six-meeting series in 1946–47 on digital and analog computing machinery conducted by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers; and the six-meeting series in March and April 1947, on electronic computing machinery conducted by the Department of Electrical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  4. In January 1948, the word “Eastern” was dropped from the name of the Association.
  5. In September 1949, a constitution was instituted by membership approval.
  6. The original notice for the September 15, 1947, organization meeting stated in part: “The purpose of this organization would be to advance the science, development, construction, and application of the new machinery for computing, reasoning, and other handling of information.”
  7. The first and subsequent constitutions for the Association have elaborated on this statement, although the essential content remains. The present constitution states: “The Association is an international scientific and educational organization dedicated to advancing the art, science, engineering, and application of information technology, serving both professional and public interests by fostering the open interchange of information and by promoting the highest professional and ethical standards.”

ACM awards

  1. ACM A.M. Turing Award. ACM’s most prestigious technical award is given for major contributions of lasting importance to computing.
  2. ACM Prize in Computing. Recognizes an early to mid-career fundamental innovative contribution in computing that, through its depth, impact and broad implications, exemplifies the greatest achievements in the discipline.
  3. ACM Thacker Breakthrough in Computing Award. Celebrates Chuck Thacker’s pioneering contributions in computing — “the pioneering design and realization of the first modern personal computer — the Alto at Xerox PARC — and seminal inventions and contributions to local area networks (including the Ethernet), multiprocessor workstations, snooping cache coherence protocols, and tablet personal computers” — and his long-term inspirational mentorship of generations of computer scientists. The ACM Breakthrough Award recognizes individuals with the same out-of-the-box thinking and “can-do” approach to solving the unsolved that Thacker exhibited. The recipient should be someone who has made a surprising or disruptive leapfrog in computing ideas or technologies.
  4. ACM/CSTA Cutler-Bell Prize in High School Computing. Recognizes talented high school students in computer science. The intent of the program is to promote and encourage the field of computer science, as well as to empower young and aspiring learners to pursue computing challenges outside of the traditional classroom environment. Eligible applicants include graduating High School Seniors residing and attending school in the United States. The challenge will focus on developing an artifact that engages modern computing technology and computer science. Judges will be looking for submissions that demonstrate ingenuity, complexity, relevancy, originality, and a desire to further computer science as a discipline.
  5. ACM Distinguished Service Award. Awarded on the basis of value and degree of services to the computing community. The contribution should not be limited to service to the Association, but should include activities in other computer organizations and should emphasize contributions to the computing community at large.
  6. ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award. Presented annually to the author(s) of the best doctoral dissertation(s) in computer science and engineering.
  7. ACM — IEEE CS Eckert-Mauchly. For contributions to computer and digital systems architecture where the field of computer architecture is considered at present to encompass the combined hardware-software design and analysis of computing and digital systems.
  8. ACM Frances E. Allen Award. Presented to an individual who has exemplified excellence and/or innovation in mentoring with particular attention to recognition of individuals who have shown outstanding leadership in promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion in computing.
  9. ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award. Awarded to the outstanding young computer professional of the year, selected on the basis of a single recent major technical or service contribution. The candidate must have been 35 years of age or less at the time the qualifying contribution was made.
  10. ACM Gordon Bell Prize. Recognizes outstanding achievement in high-performance computing. The purpose of the award is to track the progress over time of parallel computing, with particular emphasis on rewarding innovation in applying high-performance computing to applications in science, engineering, and large-scale data analytics. Prizes may be awarded for peak performance or special achievements in scalability and time-to-solution on important science and engineering problems.

Why a separate association, for now

  1. Keen interest in the hardware. ACM focuses on software. IEEE focuses on hardware.
  2. Need for an absolute focus on quantum computing.
  3. Priority for quantum computing.

Quantum computing needs a dedicated association, undistracted by all of the baggage and competing interests of classical computing

Quantum computing needs a keen focus on hardware as well

Criteria for merger with ACM proper

  1. The financial cost and organizational overhead of an entirely new association could be quite daunting.
  2. Potential for synergism.
  3. Common goals. Computational parallelism. High-performance computing. Intractable problems and applications.
  4. Common interests.
  5. Shared interest.
  6. Expedience. Start small and possibly diverge once a critical mass is achieved

Relation to IEEE and the IEEE Computer Society

Summary of the IEEE Computer Society

  1. We Are the Home for Computer Science and Engineering Leaders. The IEEE Computer Society is the premier source for information, inspiration, and collaboration in computer science and engineering. Connecting members worldwide, the Computer Society empowers the people who advance technology by delivering tools for individuals at all stages of their professional careers. Our trusted resources include international conferences, peer-reviewed publications, a robust digital library, globally recognized standards, and continuous learning opportunities.
  2. The Premier Organization for Computing Professionals. As the world’s top member organization dedicated to computer science and technology, the IEEE Computer Society advances the theory, design, practice, and application of computer and information-processing science and technology, as well as the professional standing of its members.
  3. A Society Dedicated to Empowering Technology Leaders. We strive to be the leading provider of technical information, community services, and personalized support to the world’s computer science and technology communities, as well as to celebrate the contributions of computer science and engineering professionals who develop new technologies and applications to improve the lives of people everywhere.
  4. Over 75 Years of Innovation and Leadership. The IEEE Computer Society traces its origins back to 1946. For over 75 years, our members have played a central role in the rapid evolution of computer technologies, and we’ve grown from a small group of specialists to an international organization with more than 373,000 individuals who are dedicated to advancing all aspects of computer science and engineering.
  5. What We Do. The IEEE Computer Society offers an array of products and services to keep you and your organization at the top of technology: 215+ conferences, a digital library (CSDL) with 847k articles, peer-reviewed magazines and journals, online education, and a solutions center. Conferences | Digital Library | Publications | Education | Resource Center.
  6. IEEE Computer Society Vision. To be the leading provider of technical information, community services, and personalized services to the world’s computing professionals.
  7. IEEE Computer Society Field of Interest. The scope of the Society shall encompass all aspects of theory, design, practice, and application relating to computer and information processing science and technology.
  8. IEEE Computer Society Goal. Be essential to the global technical community and computer professionals everywhere and be universally recognized for the contributions of technical professionals in developing and applying technology to improve global conditions.
  9. The purposes of the Society shall be scientific, literary, and educational in character. The Society shall strive to advance the theory, practice, and application of computer and information processing science and technology and shall maintain a high professional standing among its members. The Society shall promote cooperation and exchange of technical information among its members and to this end shall hold meetings for the presentation and discussion of technical papers, shall support life long professional education and certification, shall develop standards, shall publish technical journals, shall provide technical and professional products and services, and shall through its organization and other appropriate means provide for the needs of its members.
  10. Strategic Goals for the Society. Engage more students and early career professionals. Engage more industry individuals and organizations. Lead the way in new technical areas.
  11. Standards activities. The Computer Society is home to 205 active technical standards. The Computer Society recognizes that standards fuel the development and implementation of technologies that influence and transform the way we live, work, and communicate. The Computer Society strongly supports the development of new technical standards to reflect the continuous creation of new practices and technologies. Seventeen Computer Society standards committees and their working groups are currently developing almost 200 new standards.
  1. The IEEE Computer Society traces its origins to the 1946 formation of the Subcommittee on Large-Scale Computing Devices (LCD) of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE). Five years later, the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE) formed its Professional Group on Electronic Computers (PGEC). The principal volunteer officers of both these groups were designated chairs.
  2. The AIEE and the IRE merged in 1963 to become the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). The respective committee and group of the predecessor organizations combined to form the modern IEEE Computer Society. The society’s principal volunteer officer has been designated as president since 1971.
  3. The Computer Society celebrated its 70th anniversary in 2016. [Which means they celebrated their 75th anniversary in 2021.]
  1. https://www.computer.org/
  2. https://www.computer.org/about
  3. https://www.computer.org/about/cs-history
  4. https://www.computer.org/about/vision
  5. https://www.computer.org/volunteering/boards-and-committees/resources/constitution
  6. https://www.computer.org/volunteering/boards-and-committees/standards-activities/home

Relation to the American Physical Society (APS)

Relation to Nature magazine

arXiv as the premiere repository for published papers on quantum computing

phys.org for news on the latest papers posted on arXiv.org

A simplified and streamlined association

Cooperation with ACM

ACM Transactions on Quantum Computing (TQC) journal

  1. New York, NY, December 14, 2020 — ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, today announced the inaugural issue of ACM Transactions on Quantum Computing (TQC), a new peer-reviewed journal with a focus on the theory and practice of quantum computing. TQC publishes high-impact, original research papers and select surveys on topics in quantum computing and quantum information science.
  2. Though quantum computing, an interdisciplinary field that draws on contributions from computer science, physics, mathematics, and other disciplines, has been around since the 1980s, recent advances have propelled it to become one of the most highly anticipated innovations. Some of the largest technology companies are in a race to produce the first quantum computer, and governments around the world have invested billions in developing this burgeoning field.
  3. It is expected that quantum computers, though not yet a fully realized technology, will be both disruptive and transformative, providing solutions to problems that were previously thought too complex. Many scientists also believe that quantum computing has the potential to usher in valuable advances in a number of areas including pharmaceuticals, materials science, artificial intelligence, and transportation, among many others.
  4. “Quantum computing is at a tipping point,” said TQC Co-Editor-in-Chief Travis S. Humble of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. “A worldwide effort is underway to address not only the engineering challenges of developing a quantum computer, but the potential software applications as well. Presently most of the research in the field has been published in physics journals. We envision TQC as the first computing-centric journal that will take a broad approach to quantum information science and become the flagship journal of this promising new field.”
  5. “Quantum computing is very different from other areas of computing, as it traverses many disciplines,” added TQC Co Editor-in-Chief Mingsheng Ying of the University of Technology Sydney. “So we will be taking new approaches to encourage a diverse range of submissions to this journal. We envision TQC as the home for the most important new research in quantum information science. Significantly, we plan on publishing work by established thought leaders, and we hope the journal will encourage the younger generation to enter this exciting new field.”
  6. Topics covered in TQC include, but are not limited to: models of quantum computing, quantum algorithms and complexity, quantum computing architecture, principles and methods of fault-tolerant quantum computation, design automation for quantum computing, quantum programming languages and systems, distributed quantum computing, quantum networking, quantum security and privacy, and applications (e.g., in machine learning and AI).
  7. The inaugural issue of TQC presents a collection of five outstanding research papers that capture the breadth and sophistication of quantum computing research including (partial list): a novel technique for decomposition of a large class of quantum circuits that can achieve a significant improvement of depth over the best-known qubit only techniques; an efficient procedure for characterizing Pauli channels, which are an important noise model in many practical quantum computing architectures; and new quantum machine learning algorithms for training and evaluating feedforward neural networks that can be quadratically faster in the size of the network than their classical counterparts.
  8. In addition to Co-EICs Ying and Humble, the TQC editorial team includes Fred Chong, University of Chicago; Richard Jozsa, University of Cambridge; and Peter Shor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who will serve as members of TQC’s Advisory Board. The editorial team also includes 16 Associate Editors representing various countries including Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Japan, Latvia, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Quantum computing is only a small “corner” of ACM, a diluted focus, not a dedicated and exclusive focus

ACM as a scientific and educational organization

Association for Quantum Computing Machinery as a QSTEM research, practice, and educational organization

  • The Association for Quantum Computing Machinery is a QSTEM research, practice, and educational organization.

When should such an association be brought into existence?

The association will happen when a motivated team of founding fathers make it happen

Timing for creation of an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery

But the sooner this effort gets started, the better

  1. Systematizing the ad hoc.
  2. Turning craft into discipline and engineering.
  3. Assuring that everything technical has a solid foundation of science.

Why it may be too soon to get this organized

  1. Not even a coherent definition for quantum information.
  2. Quantum information theory is not even started or even recognized as a field.
  3. Quantum computer engineering is not even started or even recognized as a field.
  4. Quantum computer science is not even started or even recognized as a field.
  5. Quantum software engineering is not even started or even recognized as a field.
  6. No coherent high-level programming model.
  7. Only toy and relatively simple algorithms are currently feasible.
  8. Too much is done on an ad hoc basis, with no sense of being systematic.
  9. No sense that we are near to any dramatic advantage for quantum computing.
  10. No practical and production-scale applications have been demonstrated.

Need for a core team of elite founding fathers

Need for an advisory board to drive organization of the association

My only role is at this idea stage

Details of founding, organization, and operation of the association are beyond the scope of this proposal

Should founding of the association be synchronized with The ENIAC Moment for quantum computing?

  1. Long before The ENIAC Moment. More than a year before.
  2. Shortly before The ENIAC Moment. Up to a year before.
  3. Synchronized with The ENIAC Moment. No more than a couple of months before or after.
  4. Shortly after The ENIAC Moment. Up to a year after.
  5. Long after The ENIAC Moment. More than a year after.

ACM was founded very shortly after ENIAC went operational

The ENIAC Moment for quantum computing should be in sight

28 if not 32-qubit algorithms should be common

Origin relative to a Quantum Winter

  1. Die off due to the Quantum Winter.
  2. Survive the Quantum Winter. Limp along, neither dying off nor thriving.
  3. Thrive during the Winter. Largely due to a research and academic focus.

Need for sponsors

Reverse sponsorships

  • Commercial conferences.
  • Commercial seminars.
  • Commercial workshops.
  • Trade shows.
  • Certification programs.
  • Standardization efforts.
  • Commercial training programs.
  • Outreach programs. Such as to minority and underserved communities.

Are the quantum old guard over the hill or too busy to focus on founding an association?

But the quantum old guard would be ideal for an emeritus advisory board

  1. Offer sage advice.
  2. Express what services they want and need.
  3. Express what they value and find useful and helpful.
  4. Provide historical context.

Should academia or industry lead the push for an association?

Role of government is vitally significant — not just academia and industry

  1. Government is typically the single largest consumer of most technical products.
  2. Government requirements commonly drive the high-end interest in most technical products.
  3. Government grants frequently fund much of research and advanced development for many technologically-advanced products.
  4. For example, government funded ENIAC and other early computers. And supercomputers.
  5. For example, government funded early Internet networking research and development. The ARPANET, etc.
  6. Government drives a lot of the interest in standards. Government has a strong desire to acquire compatible products from a diversity of vendors.
  7. NIST — the National Institute of Standards and Technology — performs a lot of fundamental research which drives a lot of academic research.
  8. Various national governments have created and funded a variety of quantum initiatives.
  9. And more.

One association vs. let 1,000 associations bloom

  1. Spinoffs.
  2. Splintering.
  3. Specialization.
  4. Generalization.
  5. Mergers.
  6. Winnowing.
  7. Survival of the fittest.
  8. One association to rule them all.

Wildcard: an association led by students or smaller entrepreneurs and startups with an interest in growing the talent pool

Research, product, and practice

  1. Research. Conceptualization, theory, and testing and evaluation of computing technologies.
  2. Product. Reducing concept and theory to practical products. Including tools, support software, and infrastructure.
  3. Practice. Utilizing products to address and solve practical real-world problems. Developing and deploying applications.

Commercial competition

  1. Publications. Academic journals. Books. Web sites. Blogs.
  2. Training programs.
  3. Conferences.
  4. Seminars.
  5. Workshops.
  6. Recruiting and career services.

Drop “Machinery” to make it the Association for Quantum Computing?

  • Association for Quantum Computing
  1. Emphasize the historic parallel to ACM.
  2. Use a simpler, more modern name.

Quantum information science

  1. Quantum computing.
  2. Quantum communication.
  3. Quantum networking.
  4. Quantum metrology.
  5. Quantum sensing.
  1. Quantum effects. The essential concepts from quantum mechanics and quantum physics which underpin quantum information science.
  2. Quantum information. Information at the quantum level. From basic concepts to advanced theory. Applies across all of the areas of quantum information science. Binary basis states, continuous values of phase and probability amplitudes and probabilities, and strings of binary basis states for product states of entangled qubits.

Quantum effects

Quantum information

  1. Quantum system. Isolation and interaction.
  2. Quantum state.
  3. Wavefunctions.
  4. Probability amplitude.
  5. Phase.
  6. Basis states. Typically binary, but can be higher order, such as 3 or 10 states.
  7. Superposition.
  8. Entanglement.
  9. Product states.
  10. Interference.
  11. Measurement. Or observation.

Need for new fields

  1. Quantum information theory doesn’t even exist yet as a recognized field.
  2. Quantum computer engineering doesn’t even exist yet as a recognized field.
  3. Quantum computer science doesn’t even exist yet as a recognized field.
  4. Quantum software engineering doesn’t even exist yet as a recognized field.

Need for the new field of quantum information theory

  1. Some elements of classical information theory.
  2. But not all elements of classical information theory.
  3. Additional elements of information theory which are quantum-specific. Especially from quantum mechanics.
  1. Linear algebra. Not clear how much is needed here other than state vectors. Unitary transformation matrices are needed in quantum computer engineering and quantum computer science — execution and specification of quantum logic gates.
  2. Quantum system. Isolation and interaction.
  3. Quantum state.
  4. Wavefunctions.
  5. Probability amplitude.
  6. Phase.
  7. Basis states.
  8. Superposition.
  9. Entanglement.
  10. Product states.
  11. Interference.
  12. Measurement. Or observation.

Quantum information science vs. quantum information theory

Quantum information science and technology (QIST)

Quantum science

Need for the new field of quantum computer engineering

  1. Some elements of classical computer engineering.
  2. But not all elements of classical computer engineering.
  3. Additional elements of computer engineering which are quantum-specific.
  1. The new field of quantum information theory. Quantum information is the starting point and fundamental basis for quantum computer engineering and quantum computer science.
  2. Linear algebra. State vectors, unitary transformation matrices for execution of quantum logic gates.
  3. Focus on the programming model.
  4. Architecture.
  5. Qubit technology.
  6. Qubit control.
  7. Fault-tolerant quantum computing — full, automatic, and transparent error detection and correction
  8. Representing quantum information in its most basic and primitive form and operations on that information in their most basic and primitive form.
  9. Alternative architectures and alternative programming models. Such as quantum annealing and specialized simulators for physical systems.
  10. Quantum networking. Physically supporting the distribution and management of quantum state between physically separated quantum computers. Hardware and firmware enablement for distributed quantum computing software infrastructure, algorithms and applications.
  11. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.

Need for the new field of quantum computer science

  1. Some elements of classical computer science.
  2. But not all elements of classical computer science.
  3. Additional elements of computer science which are quantum-specific.
  1. The new field of quantum information theory. Quantum information is the starting point and fundamental basis for quantum computer science.
  2. Linear algebra. State vectors, unitary transformation matrices for specification of quantum logic gates to be executed on a quantum computer or simulator.
  3. Translation between classical and quantum information.
  4. Quantum algorithms.
  5. Quantum algorithms operating on quantum information.
  6. Focusing on generic algorithms and algorithmic building blocks and software that is generic and not specific to particular application domains.
  7. Algorithmic building blocks.
  8. Quantum circuits.
  9. Hybrid quantum/classical algorithms.
  10. Quantum-inspired algorithms.
  11. Quantum algorithmic complexity. In part based on classical computational complexity.
  12. Quantum parallelism.
  13. Quantum advantage.
  14. Quantum computation.
  15. Expectation value of results of a quantum computation. Shot counts and circuit repetitions.
  16. State preparation.
  17. Measurement.
  18. Coherence.
  19. Error mitigation.
  20. Error correction.
  21. Quantum networking. Managing quantum state distributed between physically separated quantum computers. Software infrastructure to support quantum networks.
  22. Quantum distributed computing. Quantum computations distributed across quantum networks — computations using quantum state distributed between physically separated quantum computers. Software infrastructure to enable, support, and manage distributed quantum computations — algorithms and applications.

Need for the new field of quantum software engineering

  1. Some elements of classical software engineering.
  2. But not all elements of classical software engineering.
  3. Additional elements of software engineering which are quantum-specific.
  1. Design, development, deployment, and operation of quantum applications, which utilize quantum algorithms in conjunction with classical code.
  2. Modular design. Modules, modular structure, interfaces, APIs, systems, system architectures, and networked services as well.
  3. User experience (UX) design.
  4. The craft of software development. Including specifications, requirements, coding style, naming conventions, commenting conventions, and documentation. Staged development, prototyping, scalability. Source, version, and release control.
  5. Configurable packaged quantum solutions.
  6. Quality assurance and testing in general.
  7. Quantum networking. Enabling, managing, and operating quantum networks.
  8. Quantum distributed computing. Enabling and managing quantum distributed computation.
  9. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.

Local chapters

Student chapters

ACM Special Interest Groups

  • ACM’s Special Interest Groups (SIGs) represent major areas of computing, addressing the interests of technical communities that drive innovation. SIGs offer a wealth of conferences, publications and activities focused on specific computing sub-disciplines. They enable members to share expertise, discovery and best practices.

Special Interest Groups for quantum computing

  1. Hardware.
  2. Algorithms.
  3. Support software.
  4. Tools.
  5. Programming models.
  6. Programming languages.
  7. Specific application areas. Science applications. Engineering applications. Business applications. Finance applications.
  8. Specific qubit technologies.
  9. Specific vendors.
  10. Specific products.
  11. Specific toolkits and libraries.
  12. Specific methodologies.
  13. Cybersecurity.

Publications for quantum computing

  1. Some will tend to be more academic. More theoretical and abstract.
  2. Some will tend to be more practical. Actual experience.
  3. Some will be more general in interest.
  4. Some will focus on relatively or very narrow niche interests.
  5. Some will focus on specific special interest groups (SIGs).
  6. Some will be more formal. Peer review journals.
  7. Some will be more informal. Even brief notes.
  8. Greater emphasis on online distribution and access.
  9. Topics of immediate interest. Now.
  10. Current events. And news in the field.
  11. Policy topics.
  12. Topics of short-term interest. Next few months. Maybe a year.
  13. Topics of medium-term interest. Next few years.
  14. Topics of longer-term interest. Five to ten years or longer.
  1. Algorithms. General purpose.
  2. Algorithmic building blocks. Some large, some medium, some small. Generally algorithms should be decomposed primarily into algorithmic building blocks rather than vast and incomprehensible extended sequences and trees of raw quantum logic gates.
  3. Algorithmic complexity.
  4. Application-specific algorithms.
  5. Design patterns.
  6. Libraries.
  7. Application frameworks.
  8. Applications.
  9. Configurable packaged quantum solutions.
  10. Infrastructure and support software.
  11. Tools.
  12. Performance and capacity testing, measurement, and characterization.
  13. Benchmarking.
  14. Resource estimation. What quantum resources does this algorithm require — qubit count, circuit depth, qubit fidelity, granularity of phase and probability amplitude, qubit connectivity.
  15. Training approaches.
  16. Summary of recent research advances.
  17. Summary of recent approaches to practical applications.
  18. Advances in qubit technologies.
  19. Architectural advances.
  20. Progress towards quantum advantage.
  21. Scaling of algorithms.
  22. Quantum programming languages.
  23. Programming models.
  24. Advances in simulators.
  25. Topics in physical simulation — simulation of physical systems. Physics, chemistry, biology, geology, oceanography, climate, astronomy.
  26. Quantum-inspired algorithms.
  27. Hybrid quantum/classical algorithms.
  28. Digital/analog hybrid quantum algorithms.
  29. Towards visions of universal quantum computing. Merging and integrating classical and quantum computing.
  1. A mix of dedicated journals and topic-oriented sections of broader journals. Not all topics will deserve dedicated journals
  2. Short notes. It will frequently be beneficial to publish relatively short notes, in contrast to full-length formal papers. Observations. Work in progress. Possible future directions. Uncertainties. Unknowns. Brief communication should be encouraged, especially in more dynamic areas.

Conferences, symposia, and trade shows for quantum computing

An association dedicated to quantum computing wouldn’t replace all other venues for publishing papers and holding conferences

  1. ACM.
  2. IEEE.
  3. IEEE Computer Society.
  4. American Physical Society (APS).
  5. Commercial publications, conferences, seminars, workshops, and web sites.

Symposia for quantum computing

Quantum computing community

  1. Conferences.
  2. In-person and online networking and support forums.
  3. Local and student chapters.
  4. Employment and academic opportunities.
  5. Funding opportunities — academic and commercial, private sector and government.
  6. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  7. Part of the larger quantum computing ecosystem, which includes vendors, customers, users, and investors and venture capital.

Quantum computing ecosystem

  1. The technology.
  2. The research.
  3. Academia.
  4. Community.
  5. Vendors.
  6. Customers.
  7. Users.
  8. Investors. Venture capital firms. Investors in startups.

Distinction between the quantum computing community and the quantum computing ecosystem

  1. A vendor. Selling and distributing complete quantum computing systems. Or producing components which other vendors are integrating to produce complete quantum computing systems.
  2. A customer. Buying, leasing, deploying, and operating complete quantum computing systems. Includes cloud access.
  3. A user. Using or operating quantum applications.
  4. An investor. Such as a venture capital firm.

Investors and venture capital for quantum computing

A rough 50/50 split between theory and practice

Need for curriculum and syllabus for quantum computing education

Certification for quantum computing skills

Recognition and awards for quantum computing

Students — the future of quantum computing

  1. Formal academic education.
  2. Tuition assistance. Scholarships.
  3. Field trips.
  4. Publication of papers.
  5. Participation in conferences.
  6. Networking. Other students. Professors and other education professionals. Professionals in academia, government, and industry.
  7. Mentoring.
  8. Internship opportunities.
  9. Research opportunities.
  10. Recognition and awards.
  11. Job placement in industry, government, and academia.
  12. Outreach. Attracting young people to quantum computing.
  13. Ethics.

Post-ACM focus and organization

  1. Experience from ACM over the decades of its existence.
  2. Newer technology.
  3. Newer products and services.
  4. New technology for supporting organizations.
  5. Newer and younger audience.
  6. Newer and evolved markets.
  7. New media.
  8. Social media.
  9. New thoughts on governance.

How can someone get involved? Just do it! Do your own thing! Do something, anything, and see what develops!

  • #aqcm
  • #associationforquantumcomputingmachinery
  • #associationforquantumcomputing

For now, quantum computing remains a mere laboratory curiosity

For now, quantum computing is still more appropriate for the lunatic fringe rather than mainstream application developers

For now, quantum computing remains in the pre-commercialization stage, not ready for commercialization yet and at risk of premature commercialization

My original proposal for this topic

  • Need for an Association for Quantum Computing Machinery. Analogous to the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) for classical computing, but adapted to quantum computing. Areas of interest… Quantum computer science. Quantum computer engineering. Quantum software engineering. Quantum algorithms. Quantum applications. Quantum data science. Quantum artificial intelligence. Quantum computing education. Quantum computing training. Quantum computing certification. Quantum Information Science (QIS). Quantum networking. Quantum testing. Quantum quality assurance. Quantum methodologies. Craft of quantum software development — design process, system design, modular structure, design patterns, coding style, commenting conventions, documentation of algorithms and code, debugging techniques. Service level agreements. Quantum user experience (UX). Quantum special interest groups (SIGs). IEEE Computer Society equivalent as well. Dovetails with the structure of formal education programs for quantum computing. This paper would be more of an overview rather than fine detail. Nor would it be concerned with the bureaucratic structure of the organization.

Summary and conclusions

  1. Although there are existing professional organizations for computing which can at least partially address quantum computing, a dedicated association for quantum computing is needed.
  2. There are existing organizations for computing which can cover quantum computing to a limited extent: the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) — primarily focused on software, the IEEE — primarily focused on hardware, and the IEEE Computer Society — a mix of hardware and software.
  3. One of the two core essential purposes of an association for quantum computing machinery would be to advance the science, technology, and applications of quantum computing, including research and the development and deployment of quantum applications.
  4. The other core essential purpose is to advance quantum computing as a profession, including education and training, professional development, and networking of professionals and students.
  5. The ultimate primary goal of the association would be to achieve the ultimate goal of quantum computing — constructing a practical quantum computer capable of addressing production-scale practical real-world problems.
  6. Such an association would be a nonprofit organization, not a commercial venture. Its purpose is to serve its members, professionals and students, not investors or shareholders.
  7. Local, regional, national, international, and both offline and online in scope. Overall, the association can best be described as international or global.
  8. The most essential technical areas of quantum computing to be covered by the association are: quantum information theory, quantum computer engineering, quantum computer science, quantum software engineering, quantum algorithms and applications, and quantum infrastructure and support software.
  9. Quantum information theory. Information at the quantum level. From basic concepts to advanced theory.
  10. Quantum computer engineering. The hardware, particularly the programming model, architecture, and qubit technology and qubit control. Including fault-tolerant quantum computing — full, automatic, and transparent error detection and correction.
  11. Quantum computer science. Quantum algorithms operating on quantum information.
  12. Quantum software engineering. Design, development, deployment, and operation of quantum applications which utilize quantum algorithms.
  13. Quantum algorithms and applications. Application domain-specific quantum algorithms and software.
  14. Quantum infrastructure and support software.
  15. Beyond the technical areas of interest, activities of the association would include: support for research, quantum computing education and training, quantum certification, quantum computing standards, quantum publications, quantum computing community, students, recognition and awards, code of ethics and professional conduct.
  16. Support for research. Administrative and institutional support for research. Separate from the specific technical content and funding of the research.
  17. Quantum computing education and training. Both academic and commercial. Seminars, workshops, and conferences as well. Professional growth. Life-long learning. Career development.
  18. Quantum certification. Play a role in the development and promotion of certification programs for all aspects of quantum computing skills. Credentials which bear witness to the skills of a professional.
  19. Quantum computing standards. To produce and promote the use of formal (or even informal) standards in the quantum computing community and ecosystem. Most importantly, to take an active role in keeping attention focused on standards.
  20. Quantum publications. Books and journals. Print, electronic, and online. Email newsletters. Emphasis on research, products, and practice.
  21. Quantum computing community. Conferences. In-person and online networking and support forums. Hackathons. Local and student chapters. Employment and academic opportunities. Funding opportunities — academic and commercial, private sector and government. Emphasis on research, products, and practice. Part of the larger quantum computing ecosystem, which includes vendors, customers, users, and investors and venture capital.
  22. Quantum computing ecosystem. The quantum computing community plus vendors, customers, users, and investors and venture capital.
  23. Students. Outreach. Community. Education. Internship opportunities. Mentoring. Research opportunities. Recognition and awards. Job placement in industry, government, and academia.
  24. Recognition and awards. Acknowledge and reward notable technical and professional contributions to the field.
  25. Code of ethics and professional conduct.
  26. Students would warrant special attention since they are in fact the future of quantum computing.
  27. A rough 50/50 split between theory and practice. Research and practical applications are of equal value and equal interest.
  28. The proposed Association for Quantum Computing Machinery is a QSTEM research, practice, and educational organization. Research, practice, and students are all of equal value and equal interest. I suggest the term QSTEM as an expansion of the traditional concept of STEM to broaden it to emphasize the role of quantum effects.
  29. Role of government is vitally significant — not just academia and industry. Government funds much computing research and uses much computing technology — classical and quantum.
  30. When should such an association be brought into existence? It could happen at any time, but there are any number of reasons to delay its formation for a more opportune time. The Association for Computing Machinery didn’t come into existence until 1947, shortly after the pioneering ENIAC computer entered service. It might be wise to wait for a similar moment for quantum computing. Or maybe wait until quantum computing has a more advanced programming model which is more usable by less-elite professionals.
  31. Ultimately, the association will happen when a motivated team of founding fathers (and mothers!) get together and put in the effort to make it happen — in a sustainable manner.
  32. Some sponsors may be needed to get the association off the ground financially initially, but primarily it would be funded by memberships, although ongoing sponsorships may be appropriate, provided that there are no strings attached and that sponsors get no say in the operation or administration of the association.
  33. How can someone get involved? Just do it! Do your own thing! Do something, anything, and see what develops!
  34. For now, quantum computing remains a mere laboratory curiosity.
  35. For now, quantum computing is still more appropriate for the lunatic fringe rather than mainstream application developers.
  36. For now, quantum computing remains in the pre-commercialization stage, not ready for commercialization yet and at risk of premature commercialization. Much more research, prototyping, and experimentation is needed before commercial products and production-scale applications can even be conceptualized with enough detail and accuracy to avoid premature commercialization.
  37. But we’re still in the early days, when an association dedicated to quantum computing could well make the difference in getting past both the laboratory curiosity stage and the lunatic fringe stage.

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Jack Krupansky

Jack Krupansky

Freelance Consultant

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